Clinton’s Silicon Valley secrets: Google boss Eric Schmidt drew up campaign plan – and she met Uber, Airbnb and Lyft executives for private ’roundtable’

  • Google’s source of money is not accounted for by ad sales
  • Insane flow of cash seems to be tied to mysterious White House directed contracts
  • Google may be history’s largest Ponzi Scheme
  • If only the FBI would conduct actual investigations
  • New Wikileaked  emails show that Google’s Eric Schmidt drew up a campaign plan a year before she announced she was running for president
  • Schmidt suggested that Hillary Clinton’s campaign be based out of New York or Chicago, but not Washington, D.C. 
  • Additionally, Clinton met with Silicon Valley start-up titan’s on the heels of a speech she gave at the New School
  • The campaign wanted her to get together with the heads of Uber, Lyft, Airbnb because those remarks made her sound anti the ‘sharing economy’ 

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New emails from the Wikileaks cache show that Hillary Clinton’s campaign had Google’s Eric Schmidt draw her up a campaign plan. 

And she secretly met with Silicon Valley entrepreneurs after some interpreted remarks she made as being against the ‘sharing economy.’ 

Schmidt sent a detailed plan to Cheryl Mills, who had served as Clinton’s chief of staff when she was secretary of state, in April 2014, a full year before the Democratic politician announced her bid for the White House.  

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Google's Eric Schmidt (pictured) gave Hillary Clinton's team a campaign plan a full year before she announced her intentions to run for president

Google's Eric Schmidt gave Hillary Clinton's (pictured) team a campaign plan a full year before she announced her intentions to run for president

Google’s Eric Schmidt (left) gave Hillary Clinton’s (right) team a campaign plan a full year before she announced her intentions to run for president 

The Google titan outlined a number of things, including one Clinton definitely listened to – where she should base her campaign headquarters.  

‘Its important to have a very large hiring pool (such as Chicago or NYC) from which to choose enthusiastic, smart and low paid permanent employees,’ Schmidt argued.

He also nixed Washington, D.C., as an idea, even though it’s a thriving city for millennials. 

‘DC is a poor choice as its full of distractions and interruptions,’ he wrote in the memo, emailed to Mills. 

She then passed it along to John Podesta, whose emails were hacked and made public by Wikileaks. 

The note was also addressed to Robby Mook, who became Clinton’s campaign manager, and David Plouffe, a veteran of President Barack Obama’s campaign, who now works for Uber. 

Uber's Rachel Whetstone (left) was among those invited to attend a closed-door roundtable with Hillary Clinton after the candidate ruffled feathers for worrying about how workers were treated by companies doing business in the 'sharing economy' 

Uber’s Rachel Whetstone (left) was among those invited to attend a closed-door roundtable with Hillary Clinton after the candidate ruffled feathers for worrying about how workers were treated by companies doing business in the ‘sharing economy’ 

Airbnb's Brian Chesky (pictured) and Lyft's Logan Green were invited to attend a closed-door meeting with Hillary Clinton last August, Wikileaked emails reveal

Airbnb's Brian Chesky and Lyft's Logan Green (pictured) were invited to attend a closed-door meeting with Hillary Clinton last August, Wikileaked emails reveal

Airbnb’s Brian Chesky (left) and Lyft’s Logan Green (right) were invited to attend a closed-door meeting with Hillary Clinton last August, Wikileaked emails reveal 

In the memo, Schmidt also argues for transparency when it comes to financial transactions. 

‘All investments and conflicts of interest would have to be publicly disclosed,’ he wrote. ‘The rules of the audit should include caps on individual salaries and no investor profits from the campaign function,’ he said, adding in parentheses, ‘For example, this rule would apply to me.’ 

THE GUEST LIST FOR HILLARY’S SECRET SILICON VALLEY MEETING 

Tri Tran – CEO and co-founder of Munchery 

Conrad Chu – Co-founder of Munchery 

Nate Fagioli – Vice president of finance for Munchery 

Brian Chesky – CEO and co-founder of Airbnb 

Stacy Brown-Philpot – COO of Taskrabbit 

Rachel Whetstone – Senior vice president of policy and communications for Uber 

Aaron Levie – CEO, co-founder and chairman of Box 

Logan Green – CEO and co-founder of Lyft 

Kevin Gibbon – CEO and co-founder of Shyp 

Scott Stanford – Co-founder of Sherpa Ventures 

Apoorva Mehta – CEO and founder of Instacart  

Clinton engaged with a broader swath of Silicon Valley about a year and a half later, sitting down for a secret roundtable with tech leaders in August of 2015.     

The reason for this meet-and-greet, explained Stephanie Hannon, Clinton’s chief technology officer, was because a speech Clinton gave at the New School a month before had ruffled some in the community’s feathers.  

‘Many in the technology community embraced YOUR comments and acknowledged that the rise of new technologies raises important questions about workplace protections, but some in the community interpreted them as challenging the promise of the on-demand economy,’ Hannon wrote to Clinton, explaining that relationship building was  the point of the meeting, in which press was banned. 

The group, which included leaders at the top of Uber, Airbnb, Lyft, Instacart, Munchery and others, was assembled so that Clinton could listen to them and reinforce that she was ‘the candidate of the future.’  

‘Accordingly, the attendees have been selected with an eye toward fostering a positive atmosphere,’ Hannon wrote. 

‘No everyone in the room will be a partisan Democrat, and some may wish to make their case for why on-demand economy companies do not compromise workers’ rights, but all intend to participate constructively and should be open to your message,’ Hannon said.  

The former secretary of state was then provided with bios of the participants, which did include a note if someone was a donor.  

‘Aaron is a significant supporter and has maxed out primary contributions,’ the email said of Aaron Levie, the chief executive officer, co-founder and chairman of the storage space start-up Box. 

Munchery's Tri Tran spilled the beans on the meeting to the website Inc.com in 2015, while Wikileaks gave the public more details this week 

Munchery’s Tri Tran spilled the beans on the meeting to the website Inc.com in 2015, while Wikileaks gave the public more details this week 

 Word of Clinton’s secret meeting eventually did make it to the press, with Munchery’s CEO Tri Tran, who hosted the meet-and-greet, spilling details to Inc.com.  

‘The sharing economy and on-demand services are already growing at an alarming rate and entering mainstream culture throughout the nation, so it’s best policy makers and tech leaders work together to make this new economy as successful as it can be,’ Tran emailed to reporter Tess Townsend about the off-the-record meeting. 

In the room, Tran said executives didn’t criticize Clinton for her views that some of these sharing companies were taking advantage of workers.  

 The executives discussed there potentially being a new, third classification of workers, beyond the W-2 or 1099 tax forms, ‘that characterized the employment of someone who only drives for Uber and Munchery for a living, as well as possibly hosting on Airbnb.’ 

Tran told Inc.com that Clinton did not express a difference of opinion with the CEOS, but ‘was warm and receptive to all of our thoughts.’ 

 He then argued that the former secretary of state was ‘rightfully critical’ of certain elements of what Inc.com called the ‘gig economy,’ but was also generally interested in what the entrepreneurs had to say. 

‘She seems like an advocate and interested in making this new economy work well for all the workers, leaders and policy makers involved,’ was Tran’s takeaway.